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to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
. i'd say no more lies, no more apologies, no more coverups. retched nixon lied because of coverups and bill clinton i am protested because of lies and coverups, where is the accountability in this administration, own up to the fact that we are at war with an evil force never be molified or satisfied until we're all dead. this is not about political offices or expanded geopolitical orders, this is about the survival of our civilization, if this administration can't or won't lead in the battle then step aside and let someone do it who won't lie to us and endanger our children. [applause] well, on friday, the office of the director of national intelligence issued a statement, attempting to put the matter to rest, going to washington is the chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge. why this document dump on a friday afternoon? >> well, you know, governor, as well as everyone else when you've got bad news, the place you put it is late on friday, what we had with the statement from director of national intelligence, a person who is a top intelligence officer in the united stat
between nixon and kennedy. >> that was a very -- >> the actual camera. >> love actually you come in to cbs news here in new york and we have art facts every where. they are all over this new set. >> it's a museum out there. >> i was thinking about it. that debate was an interesting one. it was like did you watch it or did you hear it? if you watched it -- >> had a very different perception. >> very different. >> shows how the candidates handle pressure. is this the way i want to see the demeanor of my leader and it's credited with putting kennedy to the white house that debate because nixon had a lead at the time. >> nixon would argue he had a lead all along. that's another story. he would say the election -- that's another story. three debates, of course, first one. a lot of people think this is the most important one. we'll talk about the big debate moments over the last elections. stick with us. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday" and we'll be back with a look at the debates and how you win and how you lose on the big night. >> i got some ideas on,000 win. >> really? >> i don't
the first-ever televised debate richard nixon chose to wear no makeup. with a 5:00 shadow he looked sweaty and uncomfortable compared to the tanned, relaxed john f. kennedy. then voters heard the impatient sighs of al gore. it was clear by the microphones while george w. bush was talking. it played into a larger narrative into the campaigns. it re-inforced what the audience thought about the candidates. >> when gore sighed endlessly and moaned during the debate and we saw that on television, it just emphasized the idea that he was arrogant and condescending, something people were already concerned about. when nixon was sweating, there was some sense that he was already shifty and there was an anxiety in his soul as well as his body. >> that's what the question in this campaign is about. >> reporter: in a later debate that year gore appeared to invade the personal space of bush. >> i believe i can. >> reporter: a move which made him look awkward compared to his relaxed opponent. in 1992 george h.w. bush was caught twice by cameras glancing at his watch during a town hall debate with voters
-- for example, think about president reagan, he was running against the catastrophic effects of nixon's wage on price controls lasting up to 1980 and carter. the "new york times," i have to remind you, the "new york times" on the eve of the election between reagan and carter had it too close to call. lou: the third debate? >> that is right. lou: i know it's right. up next, governor romney trailing in the polls, but does history show come from behind wins are possible? as we disused, there -- discussed, there is history here. we'll have the report. are taxpayer dollars -- they call it art, but looks like obscenity to me, but there we are. we'll look at the ways in which the obama administration expresses religious sensitivity and tolerance and other ways in which had does not seem to give much of a damn. we'll talk about catth catholic league president, bill don hue and karen handle here in just moments. [ owner ] i need to expand to meet the needs of my growing business. but how am i going to fund it? and i have to find a way to manage my cash flow better. [ female announcer ] our wells farg
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration, believed to cement president nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise, a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war, and this was sort of the definitive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980, and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election, despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with iran to delay freeing the hostages and deny the troubled carter campaign a huge preelection boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective
presidential debate started with kennedy-nixon 50 years ago, over 60% of television were watching the debate. now it's down to a quarter to 30% of television but that is still a lot of people because some of the people who haven't made up their minds minds they are going to base their decision on the debates. this is about as much attention they are going to pay to the race. it's not the size of the audience, it's in who is in the audience. >> jamie: this is superbowl, this is going to be our olympics fox, we'll have wall to wall coverage. thanks for your thoughts today. >> as they prepare for the debates this coming weeks. vice presidential candidates are out on the trail. biden and paul ryan stumping in critical battleground states. chris wallace sat down for an exclusive one-on-one interview with congressman ryan. what he has to say about u.s. policies in the middle east, iran and the economy. >> jamie: plus we know that peanut allergies can be fatal in some cases, they can really make you sick. they are especially dangerous for children with peanut allergies. alarming information about w
bebe? >> this is another request from president nixon who started this stuff when he went on the old show called laugh-in and spoke the immortal words -- sock it to me. there is a freeze frame on internet that shows president and mrs. obama all smily but when elizabeth hasselbeck starts to ask a question the president's face gets very grim, and michelle obama's fay is like this. >> rick: you were watching very closely. [ laughter ] >> rick: word on friday that the president did have a conversation late in the week with the prime minister, the media has covered the apparent approximate between the two world leaders, what do you think? >> this is longest running soap opera versus obama. bb versus obama. he had to do something to make the damage less damaging. he did not 6 the 13 bilaterals he had the last time he was in new york. obama didn't have any. media is saying that is perfectly okay because the salesman running for office. that is explanation but to accept that on its face is i think a bit not right. >> rick: world leaders speak their minds and how the media reacts. >> as presi
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
. and the experienced vice president richard nixon seemed uncomfortable, even sweaty. as the debate's producer, the late don hewitt, remembered. >> i looked at him on camera and i thought, oh, my god, this is trouble. >> reporter: the first lesson: the debates would not just be about what you said but how you looked when you said it. and mistakes could have huge consequences. in 1976 at the height of the cold war, president gerald ford mysteriously declared -- >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe. >> reporter: he lost to jimmy carter. but in 1984, another incumbent, ronald reagan, used the debates to diffuse criticism of his advancing age. >> you already are the oldest president in history. >> reporter: he was 73 at the time. >> i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. (laughter) >> "i was smiling" watt walter mondale later said "but i knew he'd gotten me there." other lessons, it may be best not to start your opening statement this way. >> who am i? why am i here? >> reporter: as admiral james stockdale, ross pro's running mate did, in 1992. d
, if this issue really gets traction that it deserves, and let it say it deserves, go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people who are dead because of this. there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. and it doesn't matter what the policies are. bill: you're 30 days out from here, under 40 days. how does libya factor in the national discussion? >> the bigger issue is not just what happened in libya. that is huge. the fact that an ambassador was assassinated is huge. the bigger issue, why didn't this white house, why did not this administration all of its various surrogates tell us the truth? they knew the truth. they just didn't tell it. and they have covered it up. in the same way they didn't tell us the truth about the fort hood shooter and didn't tell us the truth about the shooter in little rock who killed a soldier standing outside of a recruiting station. there is much to be held, they should be held accountable f
tube. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people dead because of this and there are questions to be answered. >> andrea: it's not just republicans concerned about this. just yesterday, senate democrats also started demanding answers from the administration. greg, we're 17 days out since we learned this was a terror attack. even leon panetta said this was a terror attack. but nothing from the commander-in-chief. shouldn't he have been honest the first place? >> greg: this is confusing to me. the response is let's coordinate it, with an engineering major. if he knew it was terror, they're now say it's terror, why did you go to vegas on day one? was al-qaeda playing craps at mgm grand? catching a show at the renetian? possibly carrot top? none of them were on message. the big coup here was imprinting the idea that the video was responsible in the media and the public. is it the question that needs to be asked over and over again. where in the hell did you get your source? wher
bequest from president nixon, when he went on "laugh-in", and uttered the words, "sock it to me? and there's an internet frame, the president and mrs. obama light and bubbly and smiling and the others are speaking with em this. but when elizabeth hasselbeck, the one conservative on the view starts to ask a question, the president face gets very grim, almost condescending and michelle obama's face is like this. >> you were watching very closely. >> so. >> judy, word on friday that the president did in fact have a conversation late in the week with president obama, the way that the media has covered the apparent problems between the two world leaders, what do you think? >> this is the longest running soap opera in foreign policy, bb versus obama. of course he had to do something to try to make it-- make the damage less, less damaging than it was. he did not have the 13 bilaterals that he had the last time in new york. obama did not have any and the media are saying that's perfectly okay because the man is running for office. that's an explanation, about you to accept that on its face is i th
that he gave while richard nixon continuously lost ground thereafter. the story goes that it was kennedy's tan, his youthful look that won him the first televised debate. do you think that's the full story? >> i think that's part of an lore. i think much more was this. before that first debate john kennedy was thought of as a young, not very distinguished absentee senator, junior senator from massachusetts debating against the vice-president of the united states who had stood up to kruschev. this marvelous debater. kennedy was able to not only match nixon but exceed him. people began to think of him as a possible president. >> are debates necessary for the democratic process? have the best debaters proven to be then the best presidents? >> they have in one sense. and that is one of the most important things you want from a president is someone who if he has to make a tough decision can go to americans and say, this may be unpopular with you but let me try to explain it, explain why it's the right thing to do. if a president doesn't have that he's not going to serve very well and the deba
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise statement >> we believe peace is at hand. >> the first so-called october surprise, late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election in spite of president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, delayed freeing the hostages. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> reporter: fast forward to 1992. president george h.w. bush was already on the ropes against bill clinton over a sluggish economy. when casper weinberger was implicated in the iran-con
say that it deserves. let's go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i'm going to be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people dead because of this and there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. megyn: this this story potentially at that level? >> i don't know that it would reach that level. but i can tell you it's enough concern that democrats in the united states senate. and i know some democrats in the united states house are very concerned and i believe senator kerry said i want to learn more about this. what did you know and when did you not. there are questions not just coming from republican partisans. these are people who care about americans around the world and our national security policy. megyn: they sent that joint letter yesterday and the return date on the information requested is november 13, which is conspicuously after the presidential election. but they want answers both democrats and republicans as to what went on here. thanks so muc
i explored it i assumed that kennedy had beaten nixon decisively but it only moved the poll as couple of spots but it allowed kennedy to prove that he could be president, to pass the threshold. acceptability in stature. same thing with jimmy carter. carter would not have been president without debates and kennedy said he wouldn't have been. sometimes it works at wary. generally, and, reagan, one debate, it was decisive, with one debate in 1980 and the last week of the campaign, because it allowed reagan to prove he wasn't dangerous. for romney the debate is all about being able to prove if my opinion several things, but most importantly, that he is not a bad person. he has 90 minutes, the obama campaign has spent several million defining him in a way that he murders people, that he is grossly for the rich. >> what does romney have to do? >> he needs to articulate a plan as to what he will do to change america. pat is right, he has to make himself accessible to the american people. beyond that, unless people get a sense that he has a clear at stiff vision for the country and
about presidential debates because i've watched them since the first ones with nixon and kennedy. the first ground is be who you are. you're not going to change somebody at his age who's done things very successfully. don't take advice from consultants who want you to somehow imaginely be non-mitt. my second advice is walk in determined to draw very sharp, clear lines with president obama. i frankly was startled by the ad you just showed a minute ago in which romney is in a sense embracing obama. we both care about the middle class. i don't know why he's saying that. if president obama cared about the middle class, why did the price of gasoline go to an all-time high? why do we have the largest debt in american history which the middle class will pay on for the entire rest of their lifetime? if president obama cared about the middle class, why have we had the longest unemployment rate? i think it's a mistake to be clever. i think he ought to draw clear sharp signs say here's where we've been under obama, here's where we go under omney. do you want obama stagnation? he's got to be
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)